Showing posts with label Shrubs. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Shrubs. Show all posts

GARDEN DESIGN RECIPE OF THE WEEK: ALL SEASON COLOR BORDER


Shrubs, to me, are like See's candy boxes to a chocaholic.



The reason, in three words:  Lushness, variation, dependability.


Using shrubs with varied colors and shapes of foliage, and with different flowering seasons, gives a mature, full garden border all year long.  Leaving one foot gaps between the shrubs lets you add seasonal annuals, garden ornaments, or even decorative stones or gourds, to change the look around without a lot of cost or work.


  Perennial border in spring   


INGREDIENTS (per 25 feet x 5 feet bed)


3  Pittosporum tenufolium 'Marjorie Channon' or 'Oliver Twist'


Marjorie channon  Oliver Twist pittosporum


3  Rhaphiolepis indica 'Clara'


    White hawthorne


2 Phormium 'Bronze Baby' or 'Sundowner'


Bronze Baby


3  Coleonema pulchellum 'Sunset Gold' 


Coleonemasunsetgold


2  Salvia leucantha 'Santa Barbara'


Salvia leucantha santa barbara


5 quarts of Lemon Thyme or Sedum confusum


Thyme in pot


9 Allium 'Globemaster' bulbs (or other large variety of Allium)


Globemaster  


6 cubic feet of planting compost (four 1.5 cf bags)


7.5 cubic feet of shredded or micro bark (five 1.5 cf bags)


1   eight pound bag of GroPower Plus


Another shrub border


DIRECTIONS


Add planting compost and Grow Power to existing soil.


Dig, stir, dig, stir, dig, stir, dig stir.


Dig planting holes the same depth as the plant pot and three times as wide. 


Gently loosen root ball of plants and set in hole as per diagram below.  Back fill and tamp down gently.


Create slight watering dam around plants.  Water in well. For extra fluffy plants, add some Plant Starter (humic acid) to water.


Add layer of bark mulch around plants, avoiding direct contact with plant stems.


Shrub border diagram


Raulston arboretum border


 


 


 


 


 


 


 









GARDEN DESIGN RECIPE OF THE WEEK: STONED, SUCCULENT, AND SPIKEY

TALE OF A TRANSFORMATION....
What's a black thumb to do? 

Planter before

My new clients pointed to the double level planter outside their front door and informed me that they had never, ever, grown anything there that survived.

Ha!  I love challenges.  Not only will I make it grow, I told them, but I will also make it verrrrrry unique... (which in a neighborhood full of all-green yards and pygmy date palms, wasn't that hard to achieve...)

Well, it worked out so well that I thought it would be worth sharing the recipe.

INGREDIENTS

2  Variegated pink/red Phormium (Evening Glow, Lancer Terracotta)

Phormium Lancer  

1 Burgundy medium height Phormium (Bronze Baby or Platt's Black)

PhormiumPlattsBlack

20 Coleonema 'Sunset Gold' (dwarf gold Breath of Heaven)

Dwarf gold coleonema

3 flats of Gazania 'Pinata' hybrid mix

Gazania 

3  Salvia greggii 'Furman's Red'

  Salvia greggii red 

3 flats Sedum 'Confusum' Sedum confusum










6 to 8 assorted succulents (Aeonium, Echeveria, and Kalanchoe)

Kalanchoe Echeveria    Garnet aeonium picture 2 Aeoniums

2 small to medium Three River stone boulders

Three Rivers boulder

1 decorative pot RUSTIC POT  


DIRECTIONS

Pick a sunny spot (at least four hours a day of sun)

Amend well with a mixture of Cactus Mix and Planting Compost

Plant Salvia greggii in curved row at back of planting bed.

Plant Phormium in triangular pattern in center area, four feet apart.

Place boulders and pot in triangular pattern near boulders and pot.

Plant Coleonema in row around edge of planting bed, three feet in.

Plant gazania in row on outside of Coleonema

Plant succulents around boulders and in pot.

Plant Sedum throughout planting bed to cover any bare soil.

Water well daily for first week, then reduce water to give a good deep water twice a week (more or less, depending on rain/temperature.

WATCH IT THRIVE!

Succulent and spike garden 

Succulents and phormium

100 SQUARE FOOT ITALIAN VILLA GARDEN




INGREDIENTS


SPLASHING FOUNTAIN.


BOXWOOD TOPIARIES.

LEMON TREES.

LAVENDER and JUNIPERS and ROSES.

FLAGSTONE PATHWAY.

And it's all in a patio twelve foot square.

This little condominium patio has all of the elements of a classic Italian garden.  Well, not counting the villa that should go with it.  It took one day, and under $2,000 to create.  Here's what we used:

Fountain:  This one is concrete, by Giannini, and cost $750.  But there are a lot of wall fountains available for a lot less.

Concrete bench:  Also by Giannini, matching the fountain.  But I have one almost like it that I got at Target for $60.

Lemon trees in pots:   I used Meyer lemons, which are smaller scale.  If you can't find those in your area, a Eureka will do just fine, kept pruned.  Underplant it with sweet alyssum and thyme.

Gravel mulch:  Classic gray pea gravel from Lowes.

Flagstone path:  Its really fun, in a small garden, to create a "path to nowhere."  This one curves around the air conditioning unit (concealed behind an airy Pittosporum tenufolium 'Marjorie Channon) to the back corner of the patio walls.  Its only seven feet long, but since the terminus is hidden, it seems longer.  And a wall mirror was added to visually double the size of the garden.

THIS IS WHAT IT LOOKED LIKE BEFORE
Topiaries:  Green Mountain boxwood and Blue Point juniper do well in pots.

Climbing Iceberg Roses:  This white rose blooms almost all year round here in southern California.  Its low maintenance, disease resistant, and has delicate canes that don't take up much room.


Dwarf lavender:    'Hazel' spanish lavender (lavandula stoechas 'Hazel') and 'Munstead' English lavender (lavandula angustfolia 'Munstead) fit into the 1.5 foot wide borders.

Creeping fig:  These photos, taken soon after planting, don't show the creeping fig that we planted to cover the concrete walls.  But eventually the garden will be enclosed with dark green walls, hiding the new construction.



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